October 6, 1942

The Angelo’s Bakery Shop at 58 Mulberry Street – Early Morning

The Now shot was taken on March 8, 2009.

Mulberry Street — much of it a tourist trap around Little Italy — has stayed pretty much true to form from what it looked like in Cushman’s day.  The Angelo’s, at 58 Mulberry Street, was close to the southern part of Mulberry not far from where it meets Worth Street.   Today, this is part of Chinatown.  It appears that the building is still there but the exterior of it and the building next to it have, unfortunately, been significantly altered (it is rare today to see old buildings with wood framed windows).  The bread and other baked goods in The Angelo’s sure look inviting.  In the lower right corner of the window is a sign that reminds us that we were at war — it says along the top “New York at War” and I suspect it has something to do with supporting the war effort.  Today, a place called Ping’s Dry Beef occupies the premises.

A viewer pointed out an interesting bit of macabre history about this address (not sure if it was the same building but it could have been, although it is just as likley that the address changed since that time due to buildings being razed).  According to a November 27, 1897 New York Times article titled “His Heart Cut in Two” a murder took place as follows:

Rosario Marcigliano, twenty-seven years old, was stabbed and almost instantly killed by his brother Gennaro in a beer saloon at 58 Mulberry Street at 3:30 o’clock [the previous day].  Gennaro made his escape.

Rosario … who was a fruit dealer, lived at 40 Mott Street with his brothers, Pasquale and Gennaro, also fruit vendors.  [Both] are married and have families.  The dead man was single and boarded with Pasquale.  The three brothers went to the saloon of Dominico Russo, at 58 Mulberry Street … and spent the day playing cards and drinking beer.

Gennaro, who had been drinking more than his brothers, became ugly about 3:30 … P.M. and accused Rossario of cheating at cards.  Gennaro accused Rosario of being drunk.  Rosario answered back: ‘You are drunk.  You had better go home.”

[A fight ensued, ending with Rosario crying out that he had been stabbed.]  The next instant Gennaro ran out of the saloon, and was lost in the crowd in the street.  Although there were ten or fifteen men in the place, no one raised a hand to stop the murderer.  It seemed that none of them knew that Rosario had been stabbed, as it was not until two or three minutes after the quarrel that Rosario staggered across the floor and fell in a heap in one corner.  His brother Pasquale tore open his shirt and saw blood flowing from a wound over his heart.  The cry of murder was then raised ….

The surgeon who examined the body said that the [four inch dirk] knife had split the man’s heart in two.  Capt. Berghold, of the Elizabeth Street station, immediately detailed several policemen to search for the murderer.

I’m not a doctor but it seems a bit of an exaggeration that the man’s heart was literally cut in two as the story says Rosario staggered across the floor two or three minutes after the fight.  In any event, he was murdered.  I wonder if Gennaro was ever caught?

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Municipal Towers in Early Morning

The Now shot was taken on January 1, 2010.

Cushman proceeded south on Mulberry and turned to his right to take this shot of the Municipal Building.  Columbus Park is in the foreground.  According to the Manhattan 1930 Land Book, the buildings in the foreground of Cushman’s shot were part of a triangular group of buildings that ran along a short stretch of what was then called Park Street.  This block of buildings has long since been razed and replaced by an extension of the park to Worth Street.  Park Street was short and ran at about a 45 degree angle from Worth Street cutting across Mullberry and ending at Mott Street.  The section of the street between Mulberry and Mott Streets is today called Mosco Street, renamed as such in 1982 (according to Forgotten New York) after community activist Frank Mosco.  Suffice it to say, Cushman’s shot may be the only one we’ll ever see of Park Street.

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Municipal Building From Below the El on Park Row

The Now shot was taken on August 15, 2010.

Because everything but the Municipal building is gone, it is difficult to get the correct zoom.  But does it really matter?

Click here to see the sext series of shots taken on October 7th.

Note: The Cushman shots have been reproduced on this site with the written consent of Indian University, which owns the Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection.


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1. Click here to see it Then and Now

Here is a view of the United States Secretariat as it appeared on July 11, 1960.

Click here to see other Then and Now shots from that day.  Note: The Cushman shots have been reproduced on this site with the written consent of Indiana University, which owns the Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection.

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A view west on 42nd Street and Broadway as it appeared on July 9, 1960.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

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Here is Delmonico’s, at 56 Beaver Street, as it appeared on July 7, 1960.  Click here to see other Then and Now shots from that day.

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Peter Minuit Plaza as it appeared on July 5, 1960.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

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A view of Pearl Street and Peck Slip as it appeared on October 7, 1942.  The oldest house (at the time) in Manhattan can barely be seen in this shot.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

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A view of City Hall in the early morning as it appeared on October 6, 1942.  To see more Then and Now shots from that day please go to the October 6, 1942 page.

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A view of Second Avenue and 2nd Street as it appeared on October 4, 1942.  To see more Then and Now shots from that day please go to the October 4, 1942 page.

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Here is a view looking up Broadway from Battery Park as it appeared on October 1, 1942.  To see more Then and Now shots from that day please go to the October 1, 1942 page.

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A view of Trinity Church as it appeared on October 3, 1942.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

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A view of Peck Slip as it appeared on September 27, 1941.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

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A view looking east on Wall Street as it appeared on June 6, 1941.  Trinity Church is in the background, the New York Stock Exchange is on the left, and a statute of George Washington in front of Federal Hall is on the right.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.