July 5, 1960

Unless otherwise noted, the Now shots were taken on July 5, 2010.

Cushman returned to Manhattan on July 5, 1960, almost 18 years after he took his October 1942 color shots.  According to his notes, he was staying at the Governor Clinton Hotel, which was across Seventh Avenue from the old, grand Penn Station on 31st Street.

The Empire State Building from Herald Square

Cushman took this shot from Seventh Avenue and faced east.  This distance and angle are off a bit in the shot below due to construction in the area.

  

*     *     *

View North from Herald Square

 Herald Square has remained pretty much the same with one notable exception being the absolute uglification of the building on the left, whose brick facade was replaced with glass.  There is still a newsstand but it moved to the right and is just out of view in the Now shot.

 

*          *          *

Whitehall Street from Peter Minuit Plaza

The Now shot was taken on October 10, 2010.

It did not take Cushman long to return where it all began at the southern tip of Manhattan.  Here Cushman returned to the area of South Ferry.  The buildings that ran along Whitehall Street (where it intersected with Front Street) back in 1942 were still there — as was Front Street (the corner of Front and Whitehall is on the far right of Cushman’s shot).  Today, that block of buildings and virtually all of the buildings that ran along Whitehall Street are gone.  One New York Plaza now occupies this spot, with it and a couple other massive office buildings cutting off Front Street for several long city blocks to the east.

 

*          *          *

Peter Minuit Plaza (first view)

The Now shot was taken on October 10, 2010.

One thing that did change between 1942 and 1960 was the development of Peter Minuit Plaza.  Recall from the June 6, 1941 page (scroll down) that Cushman took a shot of South Ferry from this general area.  In 1942, the area was wide open and the El train ran from Front Street (where the gap in the buildings that ran along Whitehall Street can be seen).  The block of buildings to the north of Front Street are the buildings the can be seen more close up in Cuchman’s previous shot.

Peter Minuit Plaza was constructed in 1955.  As evidenced by the Now shot it has been reconstructed (still under construction, actually).  Suffice it to say the area is unrecognizable from what it looked like in 1960.  The only building left intact can be seen in the Now shot; a sliver of it can be seen in Cushman’s shot.  It is on the corner of Broad and Water Streets.

 

*          *          *

Peter Minuit Plaza (second view)

The Now shot was taken on October 10, 2010.  This is another view of the Plaza from a slightly different angle.

 

*          *          *

View Up from the Battery

This is a view looking northeast from the front of One New York Plaza today.  The buildings that can be seen in the foreground of Cushman’s shot — long since razed — ran along Front Street.  The older buildings that can be seen in the Now shot run along Water Street.

 

*          *          *

Toward Brooklyn from South Ferry

Cushman then made his way, once again, along South Street, this time panning to the right to take a shot of the Brooklyn skyline.  This is near where the heliport pier is today.

 

*          *          *

Manhattan Towers from the East River

Cushman made an attempt at doing his own Then and Now shot.  This is a view looking northwest not far from South Street and Coentes Slip.  The first shot was taken on June 6, 1941.  Please refer to the comments on the June 6, 1941 page about this shot.  By 1960 the buildings that ran along Coentes Slip in 1941 were gone, replaced with additional parking lots.  Today, the gap between the office buildings is where the Viet Nam Veteran’s Memorial is located.

  

*          *          *

The Amy B and Brooklyn

Walking a little farther north, Cuchman panned to the right again to take a shot of the Brooklyn skyline, which looks pretty much the same.   Today, the big difference is the absence of the piers.

 

*          *          *

Click here to see the next series of shots taken on July 7th.

Note: The Cushman shots have been reproduced on this site with the written consent of Indian University, which owns the Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection.

1 Comment »

  1. Stefan says:

    Nice job. It’s really scary how things have changed for the worst. They try and force us to live together but it just ends up displacing the poor and middle class working people into the suburbs. There is an energy in all of the boroughs (maybe not Staten Island hehe) that should not be limited to the rich. Funny thing is that the rich people move to New York City thinking they will feel that same energy and liveliness but instead end up living with the same boring suburban rats they ran from. Now in our I-Society, you just can’t feel the same feeling as you did before. It’s a shame really.

RSS feed for comments on this post. / TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

1. Click here to see it Then and Now

Here is a view of the United States Secretariat as it appeared on July 11, 1960.

Click here to see other Then and Now shots from that day.  Note: The Cushman shots have been reproduced on this site with the written consent of Indiana University, which owns the Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection.

2. Click here to see it Then and Now

A view west on 42nd Street and Broadway as it appeared on July 9, 1960.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

3. Click here to see it Then and Now

Here is Delmonico’s, at 56 Beaver Street, as it appeared on July 7, 1960.  Click here to see other Then and Now shots from that day.

4. Click here to see it Then and Now

Peter Minuit Plaza as it appeared on July 5, 1960.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

5. Click here to see it Then and Now

A view of Pearl Street and Peck Slip as it appeared on October 7, 1942.  The oldest house (at the time) in Manhattan can barely be seen in this shot.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

6. Click here to see it Then and Now

A view of City Hall in the early morning as it appeared on October 6, 1942.  To see more Then and Now shots from that day please go to the October 6, 1942 page.

7. Click here to see it Then and Now

A view of Second Avenue and 2nd Street as it appeared on October 4, 1942.  To see more Then and Now shots from that day please go to the October 4, 1942 page.

8. Click here to see it Then and Now

Here is a view looking up Broadway from Battery Park as it appeared on October 1, 1942.  To see more Then and Now shots from that day please go to the October 1, 1942 page.

9. Click here to see It Then and Now

A view of Trinity Church as it appeared on October 3, 1942.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

10. Click here to see It Then and Now

A view of Peck Slip as it appeared on September 27, 1941.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.

11. Click here to see It Then and Now

A view looking east on Wall Street as it appeared on June 6, 1941.  Trinity Church is in the background, the New York Stock Exchange is on the left, and a statute of George Washington in front of Federal Hall is on the right.  Click here to see more Then and Now shots from that day.